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The New Momofuku Ko
Jul 27th, 2015 by donuts4dinner

You wouldn’t know it from reading my blog, but Momofuku Ko is the restaurant I’ve been to most in NYC. I only ever reviewed my first meal there, because their no-photo policy meant that my reviews would just be words, and my dearest friends have let me know that no one cares about my writing. But I loved Ko for its creativity, its super-relaxed atmosphere where jeans were recommended and the soundtrack included everything from 70s prog rock to 80s alternative to current hip hop, and the way its counter seating allowed you to talk to your chef as he used tweezers to top your miso ice cream cone with puffed black rice. It was my favorite restaurant in NYC, so I was understandably worried when what everyone is calling “Ko 2.0” opened with its much-much-huger space, its revamped menu with a higher price and no extended lunch option, and its attempts at wringing that third star from Michelin.

The first big change I noticed when I walked in with my boyfriend is that service seems to be a bigger deal at the new Momofuku Ko. Someone was there to hold the door open for us when we entered, and it wasn’t a long-bearded hipster who would also act as our sommelier for the night. The general manager, Su, then checked the computer for our reservation (there’s no more printing out your confirmation at home and having to show it at the door), led us to our seats at the counter, and made friendly conversation with us.

At the old Ko, the seats were small wooden benches with no cushion and no back. They looked streamlined and minimalist pushed under the counter, but they didn’t seem so cool after twelve courses. The new Ko has tall stools with comfortable seats and leather backs that you can melt into with your after-dinner cocktail and your full belly. There’s also a gorgeous dark-wood counter now that looks richer than the blonde wood at the old Ko, and you’ll now get a printed menu in a textured cover at the end of the meal. So that extra money you’re paying now is being well-spent, and Michelin is sure to notice that Ko is now way, way more comfortable than Brooklyn Fare is.

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC

We started off with a bottle of Riesling

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC

and then took in the sights of the new kitchen and chatted with the chef in front of us while we waited for our first course:

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC

And then, the food:

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
pommes soufflees

A Ko classic that keeps evolving, this little fried potato tube was filled with creamy pimiento cheese. Imagine eating a Lay’s cheddar potato chip, only way more delicious. And where you can only have one instead of half the bag.

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
apple, beet

A sweet little beet ball with the lasting tang of citrus. Followed by a slice of apple with the sting of horseradish, topped with smoky, crunchy rice.

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
lobster paloise, tartlet

The tiniest “lobster roll” with an unexpected mint finish (though not unexpected if you, unlike me, know what a paloise sauce is) tasted so fresh next to richer–but not any bigger–Caesar salad boat filled with avocado mousse. The woman next to us told me to put my very small iPhone in the shot to show how incredibly, incredibly adorable these little dollhouse dishes were.

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
vegetable roll

This Arctic char roll hit us with jalapeño first, then cucumber to cool it down. The freshness of herbs finished off every bite.

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
millefeuille

Like the teeniest triple-decker sandwich, this was miniature toasted bread with a little hint of brine. Our palates missed the green tea on top because of the overwhelming toasty taste, but I sure did like squashing the roe with the layers of cracker.

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
madai – consomme, shiso

I always think of Ko when I have madai thanks to the plate of sashimi included in their old lunch service that inevitably included some brand new take on the fish every time. Chef Carey wouldn’t tell us what he was misting the bowl with before he served it to us, but the scent of shiso filled our airspace. It turned out to be a spray bottle full of “shiso essence” he had, which we should all inquire about buying from them as perfume. Little bits of jalapeño and lime caviar made for occasional bursts of flavor in an otherwise very subtle dish of consomme jelly.

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
scallop – bamboo, almond

This was one of the most memorable dishes of the night, which isn’t surprising, since it reminded me of the wonderful halibut in whey I had at Atera. That was back in 2012, and I still vividly remember the experience of eating it. This was a New Jersey(!) scallop with an almond milk sauce that was slightly starchy to give some texture to the dish. The bamboo was tender, not woody, and the little slivers of green pepper packed so much perfectly-paired flavor that I felt I could’ve eaten a whole bowl of them. I can’t wait to eat this one again sometime.

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
razor clam – pineapple, basil

This was a razor clam for anyone who’s afraid of the way it looks in its long tampon of a shell. This is one of the main reasons I love fine dining: eating things I wouldn’t necessarily seek out otherwise but having them presented so beautifully that I can’t resist them. The little slices of clam had a little chew to them, while the basil seeds were super slimy. The overall effect was slightly fruity and sweet thanks to the pineapple, but it was missing the little punch of flavor I expect from a good Ko dish, and we would’ve been fine had this been a very small serving, like a shot.

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
razor clam slime!

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
mackerel sawarazushi – ginger, dashi ponzu

Mackerel sushi with lots of ginger and scallions. A layer of fermented sunflower added a grainy texture.

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
mackerel dashi – king oyster, asian pear

This broth was made with the bones of the mackerel from the previous course’s sushi, with slivers of onion, king oyster mushroom, and Asian pear. It was really subtle, and we liked how the pear absorbed some savoryness from the other ingredients present in the bowl but a little sweetness sung through every now and then.

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
sunchoke – blood orange, tarragon

This sunchoke with its skin still on was dry-aged in beef fat and did indeed look like a little morsel of meat. It was very sweet, like it was covered in a marmalade. We guessed the flavor to be apricot, but it wasn’t distinctive, just fruity and sweet next to the earthy interior of the choke. It turned out to be blood orange sauce, but we blame the restaurant for not making the flavor pronounced enough, not our own palates for not being able to discern it, OF COURSE.

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
tamagoyaki – sweet potato, caviar

Sweet soft eggs with an even sweeter dollop of potato, cut with a pop of savory caviar and with crunchy wisps to contrast all of the creamy texture.

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
cavatelli – nettle, aged cheddar

This ricotta cavatelli was rolled in a sauce made with stinging nettles to keep it very fresh and light despite the aged cheese flavor. I sort of felt like I was eating mossy caterpillars, but please ignore my imagination.

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
bread and butter

We got a little overexcited for pure carbs and took a big hunk out of this butter for our bread before I could get a picture. The combination of the bread and black radish butter made this a sour and funky interlude.

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
lobster – snap pea, citronette

More lobster! The super fresh sugar snap peas gave this a bright crunch next to the rich, buttery seameat.

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
foie gras – lychee, pine nut, riesling jelly

I’ve had this every time I’ve been to Ko and hope to have it every time for life. The foie gras is shaved cold into the bowl and then melts as it mixes with the jelly, pine nut brittle, and whole fruit slices. I thought it was better than ever, and the chef told me it might be because they’re not plating it using cold bowls anymore. I love the idea that something like the bowl temperature could affect the taste for me.

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
duck – lime pickle, xo

When I got this slice of duck breast, the lady next to me at the counter learned over and told me to savor it. It was sweet and sour, peppery, and had a thick crunchy top and bottom, like there was a piece of brittle on both sides. I never got used to the pungent lime pickle, in that every single bite was as delicious as the first. The side of XO vegetables reminded me of the first time I ever had XO sauce, which also happened to be the homemade one at the old Ko. This dish was maybe the best thing I’ve eaten at Ko yet, and you can bet I did savor it while that lady watched me in envy.

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
vegetables in XO sauce

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
sorrel – rhubarb, elderflower

If you’ve ever wondered what it’d taste like if you stuck an entire garden in your mouth, this is the dessert for you. The sorrel ice cream tasted exactly as green as it looked, but its savoryness was offset by the sweet diced rhubarb, which also added texture. The cake had a slightly crunchy, caramelized exterior, and it was entirely unfair that they hollowed out the middle of this for the ice cream, because I needed every last crumb.

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
huckleberry – laurel bay, bee pollen

I had no idea what bee pollen was before I ate it, and I’m not sure I could even fully explain it to you now. It’s pollen, nectar from whatever the bee was collecting the pollen from, and bee spit, all made into a little pellet by the worker bees for some reason. I have no idea why we would ever eat this, except oh wait, yes, I do–because it’s delicious. It was crunchy and tasted like honey, and this dessert would’ve been nothing without it. The funky creme fraiche made this a challenging dessert if you’re someone who wants ice cream and frosting after a meal, but the huckleberry sorbet was just sweet enough with the bee pollen to top it off.

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
mignardises

To finish, we had chocolate cookies that tasted like the herbal liqueur Fernet-Branca and a sunflower macaron that tasted like buttered popcorn. And then we got a little drunker and hung out, just enjoying the sights of the kitchen.

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
old-fashioned

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC
a space to the side for larger parties

The Tasting Menu at Momofuku Ko, NYC

So did I need to be worried about missing the old Momofuku Ko? Well, not really. I did miss some of the cutesy things that Ko used to do, the novelty things like the miso ice cream cone, the bento with the pork fat rice ball, or the lunchbox with fried chicken. It was fun to reminisce with Executive Chef Sean about the soft shell crab sandwich I once had in the early days, and even he seemed a little nostalgic about the magic they made over in that tiny kitchen on 1st Avenue. But Ko 2.0 is legit fine dining now. It’s comfortable, it’s beautiful, and all of the extras–from the printed menu to the mignardises you’d get at Per Se or Eleven Madison Park–are included.

Plus, with the huge kitchen upgrade, so much more food is being made right in front of you now. We watched a duck being carved, fruits being juiced, fish being finished on a Japanese charcoal grill–all things that would’ve happened behind the scenes at the old Ko. Ko used to be about watching beautiful pre-prepared things being plated from little boxes, but now it’s about also watching things actually get cooked.

And the bones of the old Ko are still holding the place up. You’ll still hear Radiohead, The Cure, and Cat Stevens on the soundtrack, and you’ll still get really delicious, sort of Asian, very tiny, extremely imaginative, wildly well-composed plates of food. And hey, with all of the extra space, you can actually get a reservation now.

Momofuku Ko
8 Extra Place
New York, NY 10003 (map)

Momofuku Noodle Bar Fried Chicken Dinner
Dec 17th, 2012 by donuts4dinner

Momofuku Ko is probably my favourite restaurant in NYC, so it was no surprise when my group of dining friends loved the whole rotisserie duck at Momofuku Ssam Bar and wanted to follow it immediately with the fried chicken dinner at Momofuku Noodle Bar.

It was approximately an entire year ago that we did this, so my review will consist solely of photos and drool sounds spelled phonetically. Get ready.

Momofuku Noodle Bar Fried Chicken Dinner

Momofuku Noodle Bar Fried Chicken Dinner
pork buns

With hoisin, scallions, and cucumber. Because you’re not going to Ssam Bar or Noodle Bar and not getting the buns. In fact, you might go to Noodle Bar after Ko just to get the buns.

Momofuku Noodle Bar Fried Chicken Dinner

Momofuku Noodle Bar Fried Chicken Dinner
the chicken: Southern style and Korean style

Momofuku Noodle Bar Fried Chicken Dinner

Saucy!

Momofuku Noodle Bar Fried Chicken Dinner

Spice-ful!

Momofuku Noodle Bar Fried Chicken Dinner

So much sweet white meat! I can’t actually choose a favourite between the lip-smacking saucy Korean wings and the crunchy Southern wings with their spiced batter. The mu shu pancakes are simple enough, but somehow that oily fried bread ends up being the part of the meal I most look forward to when it comes to the large-format Momofuku meals. I barely touched the lettuce but plowed through the fresh herbs and hoisin sauce and filled up on just a few pieces of plump chicken; even with eight of us, there was no shortage of birdmeat to be had. The rest of the restaurant, on the other hand, looked on droolily as they stood reservationless, waiting in the perpetual Noodle Bar line for not even fried chicken but ramen. Ramen, people. Make your reservation, and get your fried chicken.

Momofuku Noodle Bar Fried Chicken Dinner

Momofuku Noodle Bar
171 1st Avenue
New York, NY 10003 (map)

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