SIDEBAR
»
S
I
D
E
B
A
R
«
New York’s Best Restaurants
Apr 6th, 2012 by donuts4dinner

My five-star reviews:

Egg Fast Low-Carb Ice Cream Recipe
Oct 2nd, 2014 by donuts4dinner

A couple of months ago, I read about the egg fast on the low-carb blog I Breathe I’m Hungry and decided to try it for myself. I had the same amazing results she did during the five days I did the fast, and since then, I’ve been using an egg-heavy diet as a great way to get the weight back off after a weekend of eating towers of tea sandwiches and scones with my ladyfriends or reviewing pizza for my column. I love the taste of eggs and think they’re basically the perfect health food, so finding the I Breathe I’m Hungry low-carb egg fast ice cream was so exciting for me.

Egg Fast Low-Carb Ice Cream

The texture is amazing, so ice-cream-like that you’ll never believe how few ingredients are in it . . . and that none of them are milk and cream! Heavy whipping cream seems to stall my weightloss if I use more than a couple of tablespoons a day in my coffee, so a whole bowl of regular low-carb ice cream is out of the question for me if I want to lose weight. But this egg fast ice cream doesn’t affect me at all, and it’s suuuuuuuch a pleasure to eat. The problem is that I don’t care for the taste of Splenda in her recipe from all of the sugar-free syrup. Artificial sweeteners really stand out to me sometimes, so I was left with a lot of Splenda aftertaste with the original egg fast ice cream.

So here’s my take the very excellent I Breathe I’m Hungry Egg Fast Frozen Custard:

INGREDIENTS

8 oz cream cheese (right out of the fridge is fine)
1 cup water
10 egg yolks (use the leftover whites for a berry meringue)
1.5 Tbsp Torani sugar-free syrup (caramel is my favorite, but take your pick)
1/2 cup xylitol (Xlear Xylosweet is the one I use; it tastes just like sugar to me)
pinch of salt
optional: 1 tsp vanilla
optional: 6 Tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder

INSTRUCTIONS

In a medium microwave-safe bowl, plop the cream cheese into the water and microwave on high for a minute and a half. Whisk them together until you get a smooth, frothy mixture. (I like to use a hand mixer to make it easier.) Add the sugar-free syrup and egg yolks and whisk again until smooth. If you want to give it a richer flavor, whisk in the vanilla. If you want to make the chocolate version, whisk in the unsweetened cocoa powder.

Microwave the mixture on high for 30 seconds, and then whisk it again. Repeat this 5 times. (I think the idea is that if you do all of the microwaving at once, you’ll end up with cooked eggs in your ice cream, which I can tell you from experience is gross.)

Chill the mixture in the refrigerator or freezer until it’s cold, and then process it your ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions. (I have the Cuisinart ICE-21 and absolutely love it.) When it looks like you just have a few minutes left (just keep testing it with a spoon until you start getting a consistency you like), it’s a good idea to add in 3 Tbsp of any liquor you like. Something like whiskey is going to give it a little flavor, while something like vodka will leave the flavor alone; the point is just to keep the ice cream from crystallizing when you freeze it.

It’s going to be a little melty still when you pull it out of the ice cream maker (hence my pictures), but it’ll be perfect after a couple of hours in the freezer. I hope you enjoy it as much as I have!

Egg Fast Low-Carb Ice Cream
spinning in the ice cream maker and looking like a butt

Egg Fast Low-Carb Ice Cream
the super rich chocolate version

Egg Fast Low-Carb Ice Cream
the buttery caramel version

Egg Fast Low-Carb Ice Cream

Egg Fast Low-Carb Ice Cream
with raspberry whipped cream and unsweetened baking chocolate chunks

Egg Fast Low-Carb Ice Cream
the final product in my Tovolo Ice Cream Tub

The New Brunch Menu at Ted’s Montana Grill
Sep 29th, 2014 by donuts4dinner

If you’re like me, you probably think of Ted’s Montana Grill as a place for business deals, happy hours, and big, juicy bison steaks. The Midtown location in NYC is great for all of those things, with its hardwoods and low lighting and intimate booths, but when Creative Communications Consultants invited me in to try a complementary meal at Ted’s Montana Grill, they encouraged me to give the newly-revamped brunch menu a chance.

Because Ted’s is in a more business-oriented part of town, I would’ve never thought of it for brunch, and the massive space was pretty quiet when we arrived at 1 p.m. An hour later, though, things were filling up, so I guess it just takes people a little time to make their way uptown. The staff told my boyfriend and me that when designing the new brunch menu, they wanted to please the people who were there for breakfast foods and the people who wanted to eat the Ted’s signature items no matter the time of day, so we ordered a mix of the two.

Ted's Montana Grill, NYC

There’s a dim lamp in each of the high-walled booths and a map of the American West covering each table. It’s very handsome and atmospheric.

Ted's Montana Grill, NYC

We had just come back from a trip to the Philippines, so my boyfriend adorably tried to order a glass of pineapple juice. Ted’s doesn’t have that, but they do have fresh-squeezed orange and grapefruit juices with thick paper straws.

Ted's Montana Grill, NYC

Some nice half-sour pickles arrived for us to savor while we admired the gigantic bison head on the wall behind us. These were perfectly salty and still retained so much of their cucumber flavor. I wanted to put them on a burger immediately.

Ted's Montana Grill, NYC

Ted's Montana Grill, NYC
bison short rib hash

They’re not lying when they say everything is made in-house here; we could tell that the sweet corn had been cut right off the cob for this dish. It was filled with tender, fall-apart bison short ribs with tons of BBQ flavor. They tasted so beefy, yet with just a hint of something extra. The rich flavors of the onion and peppers hit us first, but then a little brightness from the cucumber came in at the end. There was so much depth in this plate; certain bites had a combination of flavors that made me pause to enjoy the bliss.

Ted's Montana Grill, NYC
Absolute Best Fish sandwich

I’m a little bit skeptical when you start using too many superlatives, but this really was one of the finest fish sandwiches I’ve had. The breading was crunchy but not too thick, the cod was so flaky it didn’t want to stay contained in the breading, and the grainy bun added earthiness and made the sandwich feel more upscale. I’m such a tartar sauce snob, but this one was very flavorful with its chives and capers and totally passed my test. The coleslaw was so tangy, and I loved the green onion in it. And the fries–OMG, perfect. They were like county fair fries, super crispy and with the skin still on, extra salty and oily without being greasy. This wasn’t only a great fish sandwich but a great plate all around, where even the side dishes were stars.

Ted's Montana Grill, NYC

Ted's Montana Grill, NYC

Ted's Montana Grill, NYC
huevos rancheros

This isn’t usually something I’d order (I want carbs on carbs with extra meat for brunch), but the manager told us it was one of her favorites and that we’d want to eat the house-made tomatillo salsa on everything. Apparently the chef had a Latino friend consult on how to make it extra-authentic, and we did think it was a winner. It actually tasted like it had mango or pineapple added to it, but it turns out that was just the natural sweetness of the tomatillo. It gave us a slow burn in the back of the throat, tamed by the egg and crispy tortilla. It could’ve actually been spicier for my taste, but this was a really hearty dish, great for vegetarians who still eat eggs.

Ted's Montana Grill, NYC
French toast

This is exactly what I want from French toast. It was like someone took the very best banana bread from their grandma’s kitchen to make this. The outside had a crunchy coating, and the inside was nice and fluffy, not too dense. The bananas on the side were cooked down to sugary-sweetness, and they imparted a little of their flavor onto the dollop of smooth whipped cream. Even the butter served alongside the dish somehow seemed exceptional, just because it was salted. I would order this every time, with a short rib hash to take care of the part of me that loves savory alongside my sweet.

Ted's Montana Grill, NYC

Ted's Montana Grill, NYC

Growing up in Ohio, my family farm was down the road from a field full of bison, and my mom used to take my little sister and me to the field on summer afternoons to visit them. I have such fond memories of those times and remember how majestic I used to think the bison were, so it sort of warms my heart that Ted’s Montana Grill brought the bison back to the American table and made a market for bison farmers. On top of that, I loved everything I ate at Ted’s. I’ll think about that tender short rib, those county fair fries, and the crispy coating on the French toast for a long time to come, and with bottomless brunch cocktails, I know other New Yorkers are going to love this new menu, too.

Ted's Montana Grill, NYC

Sottocasa: Authentic Neapolitan Pizza in Brooklyn
Sep 22nd, 2014 by donuts4dinner

I’m writing pizzeria reviews as Examiner.com’s Manhattan Pizza Examiner. I know it shows that I have the palate of a 5-year-old, but pizza’s easily my favourite food, so you can count on me for plenty of fangirling over crust and sauce in these articles.

Sottocasa Pizza, Brooklyn, NYC

I live a couple of blocks from Sottocasa but would have never noticed it, hidden away as it is underground between two staircases. I was looking for it, though, because one of my favorite Brooklyn pizza chefs, the owner of Emily, trained here for years and still talks about what great pizza it is. The owner of Sottocasa trained at NYC favorite Kestè, so it’s a Russian nesting doll of great pizzaiole around here.

I’ve considered delivery from Sottocasa before, but they have this policy of only delivering one pizza at a time to preserve the integrity of the crust for each customer. While I really appreciate the idea, when I get a hankering for pizza, it must be satiated immediately. I’m glad I waited to eat at the restaurant, though, because it’s an adorable candle-lit spot with a glass-enclosed backyard covered in breezy cloth and twinkling lights. Read the rest here!

Nihonryori Kanda – 3 Michelin Stars in Tokyo, Japan
Sep 12th, 2014 by donuts4dinner

I visited Japan at the end of last month, and on our last night, my friends and I wanted to try a restaurant with 3 Michelin stars in Tokyo. Obviously the French restaurants like Joel Robuchon and Quintessence held particular appeal for me so I could compare them to the French-inspired restaurants I’ve been to here in NYC, but we really wanted some serious Japanese cooking. In the end, we chose Kanda in Minato, and I’ll admit that I was a little afraid of our decision. All of the reviews I read said that this was true Japanese cuisine with all of its subtleties and nuances and that American palates wouldn’t be able to appreciate its beautiful simplicity. I didn’t want us to spend ¥15,000 to ¥25,000 (~$150-$250 US) and walk away feeling like we’d had a couple of flavorless vegetables and three slices of fish, but we wanted to challenge ourselves. Plus, I’ve loved the very delicate dishes I’ve had at Japanese restaurants in NYC like Kajitsu, Brushstroke, Sushi Yasuda, and Kajitsu again.

Making the reservation at Kanda was my first reminder that we were traveling to the opposite side of the world. I waited until the middle of the afternoon to call . . . only to realize that the middle of the afternoon here is the middle of the night in Japan. Most foreigners ask their hotels to make dinner reservations for them, but we were renting out a private home, so when I called back later at 2 a.m. our time, I had to make the very kind and patient reservationist suffer through my English. In the end, she helped me decide on the private room and their ¥20,000 chef’s choice menu for Saturday night.

Addresses in Japan aren’t at all like addresses in the U.S., because they use a grid system that divides the city into districts instead of using actual street names. You’d say, for instance, that you were going to building 2 on block 5 of such-and-such city district instead of saying that you’re going to 138 Main Street. It’s very easy when you’re typing it into Google Maps, but it’s not so easy when you’re trying to direct your cab driver who doesn’t speak any English. So we ended up at a curry restaurant called Kando and had to call the restaurant via Skype to let them speak to him in Japanese, but a half an hour late, we finally made it to the deserted and sort of haunting street where you’ll find Kanda.

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars

It was so nondescript that our friend Nik started to try to convey to the cab driver that he was wrong again, but then we spotted the sign for Kanda hidden next to a sliding wooden door completely devoid of any windows.

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars

Inside, though, it was bright and beautiful, all clean white walls and simple light wood. The hostess recognized us immediately as the wild-eyed, lost Americans and led us to our private room, decorated with a wooden cricket in a cage for good luck.

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars

We admired our simple place settings,

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars

and then Chef Hiroyuki Kanda came in to introduce himself. I’d read that he speaks English and would ask us about our preferences for the meal, so we’d decided beforehand that I’d tell him we were “semi-adventurous eaters” who were up for being challenged “a little bit”. Instead, I got nervous and exclaimed, “We’ll eat anything!”

And then my friends gave me death stares until the chef left.

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars

Kanda is known for their sake list, but it was entirely in Japanese, so we just told our server that we prefer sweet to dry, and she brought us this. I have no idea what it was, but even our non-sake-liker liked it.

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars
egg custard

Our amuse was this elegant egg custard with Japanese vegetables in contrasting textures and varying levels of sweet and salty. Shiso leaves are something I’ve had many times at Japanese restaurants, but I’d only ever had the tiny purple flowers from the plant for the first time earlier in the week at the foot of Mt. Fuji; in this preparation, they were much more balanced and less assertive than when we ate them off the stem.

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars
pike eel

We thought we were off the hook. Egg custard followed by eel! We could all handle this. The plum sauce on top added sweetness, and the eel itself was so tender it fell apart under the force of our chopsticks. And not just because we’re bad with chopsticks.

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars

Then this dish arrived, forebodingly.

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars

Followed by a basket of whole deep-fried fish, my nemesis!

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars

Its beady little fried eyes stared up at me, its eager little tail still flicked up in the air. And its teeth!!

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars
ayu

Luckily, I’d trained for this. The week before I left for Asia, I went to the Sun Noodle ramen dinner at Louro, where I was fed whole mackerel. I was squeamish and reluctant, but after flailing about for a minute, I went for it and became a fish-head-eater for life.

This ayu was served with a glass of beer and had a lot of delicious charred flavor. Its crispy tail was like eating a potato chip, and I didn’t even notice those teeth as I was crunching through them.

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars
tuna sushi

I ate a lot of wonderful things in Japan, but this was the single most memorable. The tuna belly was the fattiest, most tender piece of fish I can ever remember eating. The black truffles were pure earthy luxury. The salt scattered around the plate made sure every flavor was fully pronounced. But the best part was weirdly the rice. The rice! I think it had to have been made with butter, because it left a little oil slick behind when we picked it up. We were all going crazy over the salty, buttery rice and almost ignoring the giant piles of black truffles on our plates.

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars
clear soup

This looked like such a simple dish, but it left us with so many questions. What was the fish dumpling made of? Tofu? Egg? What was the round vegetable? Cucumber? Apple? We felt like our eyes were fooling our tastebuds. My palate was so confused by what I was seeing versus tasting that it wasn’t until I finished the soup that I realized it had been flavored with yuzu. (I later saw a yuzu in the grocery store near our rental apartment in Japan and died from how cool it was. Foreign produce!)

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars
swordfish

Flanked by a slice of sweet lotus root and what I think were ginkgo beans, the swordfish took a backseat to its accessories for a while as we tried to figure out what they were. Once we finally got to focus on the beautiful piece of fish, I realized that it seemed to be coated in roe. I don’t know how common this preparation is–I’ve only had grilled roe once before, at Tori Shin, but it’s a neat alternative to salt.

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars
eggplant

Tender and perfect with the sting of the shichimi spice mixture following the enticing smell of those little chive-like onions.

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars
Miyazaki beef

Apparently Miyazaki is on par with or better than Kobe beef, which explains why the three of us were falling over ourselves to out-compliment each other about this dish. It was so, so tender, which probably doesn’t need to be said. And then the crunch of the panko coating provided such a nice contrast. The mustard was flavored with matcha, which is used to make green tea, and even the seaweed salad somehow seemed new and necessary to balance the dish. My boyfriend wondered how much it’d take to convince Chef Kanda to bring us another round of this.

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars
sea eel

We ended where we began but this time with a sea eel. We were told to cut it in half with our chopsticks, which is something I don’t think I’ve ever heard before. It was so sweet, with a side of miso soup with taro

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars
miso soup

and green tea made with roasted rice water.

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars
matcha green tea

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars
watermelon jelly

Our palate cleanser was a refreshing watermelon jelly dotted with balls of fresh watermelon.

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars
barley tea ice cream

Dessert was a simple scoop of barley tea ice cream, which tasted like coffee but with a hint of grain flavor. It seemed like a play on after-dinner coffee.

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars

We lounged around in our private room for a little longer, my boyfriend picking things out of my teeth and wiping deodorant off of me with his hand towel without anyone out at the counter in the main part of the restaurant knowing, we used the Japanese toilet, because it’s not like you’re not going to use the Japanese toilet, and then we went back out to that deserted street, with some of the staff following us out to wish us a good night.

Nihonryori Kanda, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Michelin Stars

After five days of eating nothing but ramen, katsu, and double-decker Wagyu burgers, Kanda was the perfect way to end our trip to Japan. It was subtle, and it was nuanced, and I think we were able to appreciate every bit of it. But it was also wildly delicious food that I don’t think any American would have a hard time grasping. And it was definitely worth the money with that tuna, spread of truffles, and incredible A5 beef. Certainly I’d miss the opulence of the French-inspired 3 Michelin star restaurants in NYC if I didn’t have access to them ever again, but Kanda was so unpretentious in a noticeable way. There were no stacks of white plates under each dish, no little plush stools to put your purse on. The service was helpful and sweet, and everyone made us feel super welcome instead of super foreign. Such a memorable meal in a wonderful country.

“The Hundred-Foot Journey” Made Me Want to Eat and Cry
Aug 8th, 2014 by donuts4dinner

Nitehawk Cinema, Brooklyn

I entirely understand why the marketing team for Walt Disney Studios and Dreamworks Pictures invited me to a screening of The Hundred-Foot Journey starring Helen Mirren, Manish Dayal, and Om Puri last week. Even as a food-obsessed avid moviegoer, I wasn’t planning to see the movie in the theater. I wanted to watch it eventually, sure, but it looked like one of those feel-good, fun-for-the-entire-family films that I could enjoy from the comfort of my living room while also browsing Twitter. It was feel-good, and your whole family probably will like it, but it’s so, so much more than that. It made me feel so many feelings. I had tears in my eyes for about 75% of it, and I had tears on my cheeks for the rest of it. It was unexpectedly beautiful and a must-see for anyone who’s passionate about cooking and food.

Nitehawk Cinema, Brooklyn

Nitehawk Cinema is an eat-in movie theater in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, where servers bring food right to your seat throughout the show. You share a small table with the person next to you and write your order on slips of paper that attach to the front of the table and that the servers watch for while the movie’s playing.

Nitehawk Cinema, Brooklyn

The menu is full of new American classics like burgers and Carolina BBQ short rib sandwiches, familiar sides like tator tots with a twist in the form of queso and scallions, favorites from other cultures like quesadillas and empanadas, plus some frou frou farro and kale salads for the health-conscious. There are themed food and drink specials to go along with each movie, and sure, being served a meat and cheese tray in the midst of a film can be a little distracting, but I’m not complaining when I’m chomping chorizo a minute later. Plus, the theater plays these amazing retro ads and old movie mashups before the show that are better than any preview.

Nitehawk Cinema, Brooklyn

That night, we were served two types of popcorn to enjoy during the movie: herbes de Provence popcorn to represent the French cooking, and curry popcorn to represent the Indian.

Nitehawk Cinema, Brooklyn

Likewise, I had a glass of sauvignon blanc, and my boyfriend had a Kingfisher beer.

Nitehawk Cinema, Brooklyn

It’s hard for me to say exactly why the movie hit me so hard. Maybe it’s because Indian food was the first “ethnic cuisine” I ate when I left my tiny farming town and moved to the city, and I still remember what it was like for me to taste samosas and kormas and dosas as an adult who had grown up eating only American food. There’s this moment at the very beginning of the film where the young Hassan races through the streets of India, trying to catch a man who’s bringing sea urchin to a stall in the market. The moment he pops open the shell and smells uni for the first time, and his face melts into bliss–I know what that feels like.

Or maybe it’s that my Michelin-starred restaurant experiences have been so meaningful to me. I absolutely loved this scene where the director was trying to show the difference between the hearty, rustic Indian cuisine by panning over big pots full of curry at the Indian family restaurant and then cutting to a clean white plate spotted with tiny foods barely big enough to cover a spoon at the Michelin restaurant across the street. Later, we’re shown a sleek, supposedly soulless restaurant in Paris using molecular gastronomy techniques, where the clientele constantly demands style over substance. And I love all of those things! At that moment, I felt so lucky to have grown up eating the food of my family, the incredibly newfangled food at restaurants like Atera and wd-50, and the classic teeny tiny foods at Per Se and Eleven Madison Park.

I’ll stop giving away everything in the movie, but the scene that really made me tear up was the one where Hassan opens up his family’s spice box full of their own special blends, and I didn’t recognize a single word on any of the jars, and my heart was filled with all of this joy over secret family recipes and the fact that with all I’ve eaten, there’s so much more I have to eat.

This movie made me fall even more in love with food, family, and France. The acting was fantastic, the characters seemed real, and the entire audience laughed all the way through it. I understand why the marketing team for Walt Disney Studios and Dreamworks Pictures invited me to a screening of The Hundred-Foot Journey, because you can’t fit how wonderful this movie is into a 30-second preview.

It opens nationwide today, and if you’re a food lover of any kind, I hope you’ll go see it.

SIDEBAR
»
S
I
D
E
B
A
R
«
»  Admin   »  Substance:WordPress   »  Style:Ahren Ahimsa and Katie Ett